it's me and you rosie cracklin' like crossed wires

1. bruce springsteen is a rock god
2. i judge all shows by h:lots standards
2a. 'homicide: life on the street' is a 1990s cop show. why haven't you seen it yet?
2b. HLOTS BUNNIES
3. hisako ichiki is my favourite
4. sandra oh for jessica jones
5. joan watson is greater than all your other watsons combined
6. idris elba for all your favourite sacred white characters
7. lea salonga should record a les mis album by herself. i would buy it.
8. olivia pope deserves better than fitz
9. there will be irregular picspams of shows i like
10. if none of that has scared you off, i am an asian canadian woman who likes looking at media critically. white dudes are generally my least favourite character type. i mean, they have to be twice as good as everyone else to be considered half as worthwhile. (except scott summers. and if that doesn't get me unfollowed, i don't know what will.)
10a. i like elementary, but i don't think it's all that progressive. better than other shows? sure, but still too white gazey. i think this means other shows should do better, not that elementary should get tonnes of praise for...treating joan like a human being. joan, for me, is micro-resistance. elementary could still do better.
11. john cho \o/

moonberry:

Beef Noodle Soup 紅燒牛肉麵… but of course, a must in #taipei #taiwan 😋 (at 春水堂松菸店)

(via taiwanesefood)

  • Glamour UK: What do you get riled up about in a feminist context?
  • Gillian Anderson: A lot. I have feminist bones and when I hear things or see people react to women in certain ways I have very little tolerance.
  • Glamour UK: But don't you feel sorry for modern men? Not knowing whether they should help us with our bags and open doors for us or whether we'll see it as an affront?
  • Gillian Anderson: No. I don't feel sorry for men.
Some white people are so privileged, they expect sympathy for their guilt.

everythingsbetterwithbisexuals:

telaryn:

polytropic-liar:

hugealienpie:

idyllspace:

karenhealey:

dealanexmachina:

I love how when they “stopped off” in Portland and Hardison immediately:

1. Bought a microbrewery/bistropub
2. Turned the back rooms into their office
3. Found them a client

Elliot objected because FOOD MATCHING WITH MICROBREWS IS VERY DIFFICULT

THE BREW PUB MENU IS THE MOST DIFFICULT MENU OKAY

I also love how they cut a hole in that wall with a CHAIN SAW and we never ever even once saw a door there, or another space. They just did that to fuck with Nate and I approve.

Six months after Nate and Sophie leave Portland, that damned painting mysteriously appears outside their villa in Comporta. Nate tries to ban it from the house. Sophie makes him sleep on the porch until he learns how to graciously accept a gift like a functional human being.

I love how Hardison approaches moving into Nate’s life especially. Like, “uh, excuse me, I think it’s more like you retroactively moved into my life. My property. This property. That I own.” 

What’s even better about the mystery hole is that John Rogers was asked about the fact that it was never referenced again, and his response was “BEHIND THAT DOOR IS WHERE YOUR FANFICTION HAPPENS”.

You know how Jeff Davis is not a gift? Well, John Rogers was the showrunner equivalent of getting a Bughetti for your 16th birthday.

(via sanguinarysanguinity)

pinoy-culture:

nonsolamore:

It’s Tagalog not Filipino my fucking ass!!!! The national languange of the Philippines is Filipino!! Tagalog is a DIALECT. not the fucking language!

How can Tagalog be a dialect of a language that was invented in under 100 years? There was no Filipino language until fairly recently, its a modern concept. So how can a language like Tagalog or any other language in the Philippines like Waray, Kapampangan, Cebuano, Ilocano, etc. that have been here for hundreds of years prior to the Spaniards be a mere dialect of a language that was invented in the mid 1900’s? The Filipino language is Tagalog at its core because it simply is just a standardized version of Tagalog with very little input from the many other languages in the Philippines. It would be one thing if there was input and development of the language by incorporating the other languages like its suppose to but there hasn’t been a change in it and no one has bothered to develop the language past the basis of Tagalog.

Filipino at its present state with no input and development from the other languages is a dialect of Tagalog. Period. Kapampangan, Ilocano, Cebuano, Waray, Hiligaynon, Bicolano, Tausug, etc. are not dialects of Filipino nor are they dialects of Tagalog as if a native speaker of Kapampangan spoke in their own language to someone who speaks Tagalog or a Bisayan language like Hiligaynon that person would not understand what that person is saying and vice versa. These languages are languages not dialects for the simple fact that they are not mutually intelligible with one another. If one speaker can understand the other then yes its a dialect. But when the day comes that someone who natively speaks Tagalog will understand someone natively speaking Cebuano or Ilocano, etc. then it has developed into dialects but seeing as that isn’t the case and hasn’t been for hundreds of years they are separate languages and not dialects of a Filipino language that was invented within the last 50 years or so.

This would be like saying English and German, both Germanic languages along with Swedish, Dutch, etc., are dialects when they clearly aren’t.

(via leavemealonetoread)

18mr:

September 1965 was a month that changed Filipino American history. 
“I’m an SOB when it comes to fighting for the rights of Filipino farm workers,” —Larry Itliong, labor leader who organized the historic Delano strike by farm workers. 

For more: http://bit.ly/ZsUBWq -AW

18mr:

September 1965 was a month that changed Filipino American history.

“I’m an SOB when it comes to fighting for the rights of Filipino farm workers,” —Larry Itliong, labor leader who organized the historic Delano strike by farm workers.

For more: http://bit.ly/ZsUBWq -AW

(via walkingmyownpath)

defnsanity:

Lynch appreciates the potential cultural impact of his swimming, along with the few other black swimmers, such as Cullen Jones, the four-time Olympic medalist and the first African-American to break a world record in swimming. “I think it would be cool to break down those barriers. Cullen Jones already got that started, but if I could help bring other minorities into the sport, that would be great,” Lynch says.


Read more: Justin Lynch: Swimming His Way to the Fast Lane | Rising Stars | OZY 

(via seldomnaughty)